Working In These Times

Tuesday, Jan 16, 2018, 9:44 am  ·  By Shaun Richman

Republicans Are Taking Voter Suppression to the Workplace

Employees of Republic Windows and Doors factory occupy the main entrance to the factory December 9, 2008 in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo by Darren Hauck/Getty Images)  

A Republican party that survives through voter suppression may be replicating its model in the workplace. In December, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) invited public commentary on a possible revocation of a rule that makes employers provide union organizers with contact information for workers in advance of a representation election.

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Thursday, Jan 11, 2018, 6:29 pm  ·  By Ryan Harvey

Amid Freezing Classrooms, Baltimore’s Teachers Fight to Democratize City’s Schools

Baltimore residents sit in one of two overflow rooms at a Board of Education meeting last Tuesday where teachers and students protested the conditions of the city's schools. (Photo: Ryan Harvey/Rebel Lens Bmore)  

When a photograph of bundled-up students in a frigid Baltimore classroom recently spread on social media—with temperatures in schools as low as the mid-30s—the city became a focal point of public attention. But two organizations of Baltimore teachers say such situations, far from isolated, are the latest examples of why educators are pushing to radically democratize the city’s school system

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Thursday, Jan 11, 2018, 3:59 pm  ·  By Bryce Covert

Carrier Workers Are Livid After Facing Layoffs Despite Trump’s Promises

President-elect Donald Trump speaks to workers at Carrier air conditioning and heating on December 1, 2016 in Indianapolis, Indiana. (Photo by Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images)  

Even before he officially took office, President-elect Donald Trump flew to Indianapolis in December of 2016 to trumpet a deal he had reached with air conditioning and heating furnace manufacturer Carrier. In return for Trump’s pledge to reduce the corporate tax rate and reduce regulations, as well as $7 million in economic incentives, the company agreed to keep some jobs in the state rather than move them to a plant in Mexico as it had planned.

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Wednesday, Jan 10, 2018, 12:51 pm  ·  By Tanner Howard

“You’re Taking Our Homes”: Ben Carson Shouted Down by Angry Chicago Residents

Protesters confront security officers outside of a Chicago Housing Authority Section 3 Field Office, where Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Ben Carson was scheduled to host a press conference. (Photo: Tanner Howard)  

Frustrated by government inaction in addressing the nation’s growing housing crisis, protestors interrupted Secretary of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Ben Carson’s visit to the department’s Chicago offices on Monday. One protestor, Debra Miller, interrupted Carson’s speech during a morning meeting, shouting at the secretary: “You’re taking homes from people like me!”

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Tuesday, Jan 9, 2018, 12:15 pm  ·  By Michael Arria

Florida Prisoners Are Preparing to Strike Against Unpaid Labor

Florida prisoners are demanding payment for their labor. (kittirat roekburi/shutterstock.com)  

People incarcerated throughout the state of Florida are planning a January 15 work stoppage to protest their conditions, and they say they are prepared to continue the protest for more than a month.

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Monday, Jan 8, 2018, 2:05 pm  ·  By Sarah Lazare

HR Has Never Been on the Side of Workers. #MeToo Is More Proof.

As #MeToo testimony shines new light on these industries’ cultures of rampant sexual violence, the complicity of human resources is a thread running throughout several stories of predation and retaliation. (baranq / shutterstock.com)  

After human resources was informed in 2014 that Emily Nestor, former front desk assistant for the Weinstein Company, was allegedly sexually harassed by Harvey Weinstein, company officials reportedly informed Nestor that any complaints would be directly reported to Weinstein himself. 

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Thursday, Jan 4, 2018, 6:05 pm  ·  By Jessica Corbett

We’re Number One! America Leads the Way in CEO-Worker Income Gap

American CEOs make 265 times the amount of money an average worker is paid. (Getty)  

This article first appeared on Common Dreams.

As corporations and wealthy individuals across the United States are slated to benefit from massive tax breaks thanks to the GOP's latest tax legislation, a Bloomberg analysispublished Thursday found that chief executives of American companies already make 265 times the amount of money an average worker is paid—the largest CEO-worker income gap in the world.

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Wednesday, Jan 3, 2018, 4:20 pm  ·  By Bruce Vail

Here’s Why These 3 Rank-And-File Union Members Are Running for Maryland Public Office

Workers rally in Fisher Island, Fla. (Photo by: Jeffrey Greenberg/UIG via Getty Images)  

BALTIMORE – Determined to win a larger role in the state Democratic Party organization, Maryland’s labor unions are entering the 2018 off-year election season early, and betting on some of their own rank-and-file members for places in the state legislature and other local offices.

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Wednesday, Jan 3, 2018, 2:17 pm  ·  By Sarah Jaffe

How Organizers in Rural North Carolina Plan To Build Working-Class Power in 2018

At just six months old, Down Home North Carolina has big plans for the coming year. (Photo courtesy of Down Home North Carolina)  

Welcome to Interviews for Resistance. We’re now nearly one year into the Trump administration, and activists have scored some important victories. Yet there is always more to be done, and for many people, the question of where to focus and how to help remains. In this series, we talk with organizers, agitators, and educators, not only about how to resist, but how to build a better world.

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Wednesday, Dec 27, 2017, 9:59 am  ·  By Jane McAlevey

What #MeToo Can Teach the Labor Movement

Chicago public school teachers and their supporters picket in front of the Chicago Public Schools headquarters on September 11, 2012 in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)  

My first #MeToo memory is from the kitchen of the Red Eagle Diner on Route 59 in Rockland County, N.Y. I was 16 years old, had moved out of my home, and was financially on my own. The senior waitresses in this classic Greek-owned diner schooled me fast. They explained that my best route to maximum cash was the weekend graveyard shift. “People are hungry and drunk after the bars close, and the tips are great,” one said.

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