Instacart shopper Vanessa Bain shops for a customer at the Safeway in Menlo Park, California. Bain began a campaign that would lead to a Facebook group of 14,000 Instacart shoppers, about 10 percent of the nationwide total when the company started using default design tricks to decrease the amount shoppers can earn in tips. (Photo by Nick Otto for the Washington Post)

Why Instacart Workers Went On Strike

A conversation with gig worker and labor organizer, Vanessa Bain.

BY Maximillian Alvarez

Email this article to a friend

On Monday, March 30, Instacart shoppers around the country walked off the job to demand hazard pay and basic protections for working during the Covid-19 crisis. In this urgent mini-cast, we bring our friend, gig worker, and organizer Vanessa Bain back on the show to talk about the strike.


Help In These Times Continue Publishing

Progressive journalism is needed now more than ever, and In These Times needs you.

Like many nonprofits, we expect In These Times to struggle financially as a result of this crisis. But in a moment like this, we can’t afford to scale back or be silent, not when so much is at stake. If it is within your means, please consider making an emergency donation to help fund our coverage during this critical time.

Maximillian Alvarez is a writer and editor based in Baltimore and the host of Working People, "a podcast by, for, and about the working class today." His work has been featured in venues like In These Times, The Nation, The Baffler, Current Affairs, and The New Republic.

View Comments