Why Instacart Workers Went On Strike

A conversation with gig worker and labor organizer, Vanessa Bain.

Maximillian Alvarez

Instacart shopper Vanessa Bain shops for a customer at the Safeway in Menlo Park, California. Bain began a campaign that would lead to a Facebook group of 14,000 Instacart shoppers, about 10 percent of the nationwide total when the company started using default design tricks to decrease the amount shoppers can earn in tips. (Photo by Nick Otto for the Washington Post)

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Many nonprofits have seen a big dip in support in the first part of 2021, and here at In These Times, donation income has fallen by more than 20% compared to last year. For a lean publication like ours, a drop in support like that is a big deal.

After everything that happened in 2020, we don't blame anyone for wanting to take a break from the news. But the underlying causes of the overlapping crises that occurred last year remain, and we are not out of the woods yet. The good news is that progressive media is now more influential and important than ever—but we have a very small window to make change.

At a moment when so much is at stake, having access to independent, informed political journalism is critical. To help get In These Times back on track, we’ve set a goal to bring in 500 new donors by July 31. Will you be one of them?

Maximillian Alvarez is a writer and editor based in Baltimore and the host of Working People, a podcast by, for, and about the working class today.” His work has been featured in venues like In These Times, The Nation, The Baffler, Current Affairs, and The New Republic.

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In These Times is funded entirely by readers like you, but through the first half of 2021, reader donations are down 20% compared to last year. If that continues, it could spell real trouble for In These Times. We’re running a short fundraising drive (from now until July 31) to get things back on track. Will you chip in?