Rural America

The mission of Rural America In These Times is to make the issues faced by rural America part of national discourse and to overcome the rural-urban divide. 

We seek to build bridges, facilitate communication and foster cooperation between urban people who understand the value of a healthy and sustainable agricultural system, and the farmers in our rural communities that provide food that we all eat.

Latest Stories
How to Live with the New Predator that Stalks the West
Unwilling to share the landscape with grizzlies, wolves and other predators, the U.S. exterminated most of them. With wildfire, we don’t have that option.
Pepper Trail
Swamped by Vacation Rentals, Small Towns in the West Are Fighting Back
An explosion in the number of short-term rentals is contributing to an affordable housing crisis in the rural West. Some communities have responded by banning them.
Erika Bolstad
A Brief History of How Big Oil Outplayed Us All
For a century, the fossil fuel industry has outmaneuvered regulators and the public to lock in its power and profits, at the world’s expense.
Naomi Oreskes and Jeff Nesbit
In Defense of Hunting
In our age of ecological collapse, hunting animals for food is as relevant as ever.
Joseph Bullington
This Map Shows How Growing Seasons Are Shifting Due to Climate Change
EPA data shows that in some parts of the United States, the growing season is 50 days longer now than it was 1895.
Sky Chadde
The Curious Case of Carter County: How a Small Town in Montana Stopped Shrinking
On the Great Plains, these days, rural towns tend to wither. But in remote eastern Montana, one community is bucking that trend. How?
Eric Dietrich
When Conservation Means Fencing Out Black Farmers
In southern Illinois, conservation groups see a chance to protect rare oak savannas. Black farmers and hunters see their way of life being bought out from under them.
Tony Briscoe
How Farmers Markets and Food Trucks Became a Beachhead for Gentrification
In gentrifying neighborhoods, developers use food options to lure in more affluent residents, and longtime residents find themselves forced to compete against the “urban food machine.”
Pascale Joassart-Marcelli
12 3 4 5