Rox­anne Dun­bar-Ortiz grew up in rur­al Okla­homa, the daugh­ter of a ten­ant farmer and part-Indi­an moth­er. She has been active in the inter­na­tion­al Indige­nous move­ment for more than four decades and is known for her life­long com­mit­ment to nation­al and inter­na­tion­al social jus­tice issues. After receiv­ing her PhD in his­to­ry at the Uni­ver­si­ty of Cal­i­for­nia at Los Ange­les, she taught in the new­ly estab­lished Native Amer­i­can Stud­ies Pro­gram at Cal­i­for­nia State Uni­ver­si­ty, Hay­ward, and helped found the Depart­ments of Eth­nic Stud­ies and Women’s Stud­ies. Her 1977 book The Great Sioux Nation was the fun­da­men­tal doc­u­ment at the first inter­na­tion­al con­fer­ence on Indige­nous peo­ples of the Amer­i­c­as, held at the Unit­ed Nations’ head­quar­ters in Gene­va. Dun­bar-Ortiz is the author or edi­tor of sev­en oth­er books, includ­ing Roots of Resis­tance: A His­to­ry of Land Tenure in New Mex­i­co. She lives in San Francisco.
Viewpoint
The Colonial Roots of Gun Culture
The origins of the U.S. gun obsession lie in the violent dispossession of Native Americans.
Rural America
Land Claims: An Indigenous People’s History of the United States