Adeshi­na Emmanuel is an edi­tor at Injus­tice Watch, a non­prof­it jour­nal­is­tic research orga­ni­za­tion ded­i­cat­ed to expos­ing insti­tu­tion­al fail­ures that obstruct jus­tice and equal­i­ty. He is a for­mer reporter for DNAin­fo Chica­go, the Chica­go Sun-Times, the Chica­go Reporter and Chalkbeat.
ViewpointLabor
The Thing About Police Unions
Feature
Electing Progressive Prosecutors Isn’t Enough. Now, Activists Are Holding Them Accountable.
From Kim Foxx in Chicago to Larry Krasner in Philadelphia, reform-minded prosecutors are facing pressure from organizers working to transform the criminal justice system.
Feature
Police Union Fought Reforms To Address Sexual Assault by Officers
An examination of lobbying records shine a light on the behind-the-scenes clout of the Fraternal Order of Police.
InvestigationGoodman Institute
How Chicago’s Police Union Contract Ensures Abuses Remain in the Shadows
Activists are calling on the city to represent victims of police violence in upcoming contract negotiations.
Feature
DOJ: To Address “Defective” Accountability System, Chicago Must Renegotiate Police Union Contracts
The DOJ's damning report found a pattern of racism and unreasonable force, and that contract provisions hinder investigations.
Feature
Jeff Sessions Is Trump’s Nominee to Head the DOJ. Is Police Reform Doomed?
Trump's DOJ could halt federal efforts to reform police departments, but activists vow to continue the fight at the local level.
Labor
Why Black Lives Matter Is Taking On Police Unions
Feature
After Alton Sterling and Philando Castile: How the System Punishes Protesters and Protects Police
Police in Minnesota and Louisiana have their own "bill of rights" that can shield officers from accountability for fatal shootings.
Feature
How Union Contracts Shield Police Departments from DOJ Reforms
Even when the federal government cracks down on police abuses, collective bargaining agreements often stymie reforms.
Feature
Lawmakers Push for Chicago Police Accountability With New Legislation in Springfield
New legislation from Illinois' state capital wants to change the way police misconduct is handled.